See Our Courses


Administration

EDU 550  School Law for Administrators

This course is a survey of the legal bases of public education in the United States and of contemporary legal issues and cases affecting the practice of school administration.  Although the primary objective is to acquaint the student with the legal principles governing public education in the nation and the State of Maine, special attention will be given to those topics of school law which are, or should be, of immediate concern to the practicing school administrator. Summer.

EDU 551  Changing Educational Organizations in a Diverse World

This course is about understanding schools as organizations and how to change them to improve learning for all.  It draws on literature about organizational behavior, culture, change, leadership, learning organizations and professional learning communities.  It is designed to promote critical thinking about and planful action toward creating schools that are true learning organizations.  The course begins with an overview of diverse models of organizations and moves to a focused examination of culture and its impact on organizational behavior.  Frameworks for understanding organizational change and resistance to change are then explored, followed by critical examination of leadership capabilities and skills necessary to lead successful school change efforts, including shared vision, inquiry-based use of data, and broad-based involvement and collaboration. Varies.

EDU 552  Supervision and Evaluation of School Personnel

This course provides an overview of supervisory practice in public schools.  It draws upon effective schools, effective teaching, teacher and adult development, and supervisory practice literature as a foundation for direct assistance to teachers and general supervisory work.   The course includes Maine State Law regarding hiring and dismissal practices, just cause, contract issues, dismissal, non-renewal, progressive discipline, and complaint investigation. Fall.

EDU 553  Finance for School Administrators

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to resource acquisition, management, and leadership at the school level. Further, it is designed to engage students in exploring the practical realities of resource leadership and to examine in depth their own skills and knowledge in light of their goals for school leadership. Specifically, in the course students will:  1) develop a comprehensive understanding of resource acquisition, management, and deployment as a central part of their leadership effectiveness.  2) understand the procedural and legal parameters for financial and other resource acquisition, management, and deployment.  3) build skills and understanding for leading this dimension of the school effectively. Spring.


Applied Behavior Analysis

SED 525  Basic Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis

This course – the first in a series of four – will introduce educators and other interested professionals to a behavioral view of teaching and learning.  The course presents basic behavioral processes and principles (illustrated largely with respect to teaching children with autism) and provides a conceptual foundation for subsequent courses in behavioral assessment and the application of behavioral methods in specialized instruction.  Readings will be drawn from both text and primary sources, both recent and classic in the field.

This course is also designed to meet coursework requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB).  Students who satisfactorily complete the four-course sequence will be eligible, once having also met the experience requirement, for the examination to become a Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA).  This course is explicitly designed to address content areas from the BACB Fourth Edition Task List (2010) including philosophical assumptions and basic concepts of behavior analysis (F-01 through F-46), verbal and non-verbal operants (F-43 through F-46), and fundamental elements of behavior change (TE-01 through TE-21).  We may also touch upon relevant topics from other content areas. Every two years.

SED 526  Behavior Analysis and Scientific Assessment

This is the second course in a series of four.  Building on the concepts taught in
SED 525 Basic Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis, the purpose of this course is to acquaint educators and related professionals with the behavior analytic practice of science within the applied context of special education.  Within this context, behavior analysis offers practical empirical approaches to (a) the multi-faceted assessment of children’s instructional and behavioral needs, and (b) the evaluation of supportive interventions predicated on such assessment.  Readings will be drawn from both text and primary sources, both recent and classic in the field.

This course is also designed to meet coursework requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB).  Students who satisfactorily complete the four-course sequence will be eligible, once having also met the experience and supervision requirement, for the examination to become a Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCABA).  This course is explicitly designed to address the following content areas from the BACB Fourth Edition Task List (2010): identification of the individual’s problem (A-01 through A-08), measurement and measurement concepts (B-01 through B-05, F-47 through F-50, M-01 through M-15), assessment (C-01 through C-12), intervention considerations (D-01 through D-15), and experimental design (X-01 through X-12).  We may also touch upon relevant topics from other content areas. Every two years.

SED 527  Applying Behavior Analysis:  Methods of instruction and behavioral support

The purpose of this course, building on the concepts taught in SED 525 Basic Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis and SED 526 Behavior Analysis and the Scientific Assessment of Learning, is to familiarize students with methods of: a) specialized instruction for students with special needs, and b) management of behavior that interferes with learning.  The course represents the progression from conducting behavioral research to implementing practices derived from research. Every two years.

This course also partially fulfills coursework requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) in preparation for the examination for the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA).  This course is explicitly designed to address content areas from the BACB Fourth Edition Task List (2010) including behavior change considerations (TC-01 through TC-03), specific behavior change procedures (TP-01 through TP-13), and behavior change systems (TS-01 through TS-08).  Additional content areas may be addressed. Every two years.

 SED 528  Autism Spectrum Disorders: Diagnosis, intervention, systems support, and ethical considerations

The purpose of this course is three fold.  First, students will be provided a historical overview of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and will learn the revised diagnostic criteria established by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013.  A variety of screening instruments will be reviewed.  Students will learn empirically validated strategies for the education and treatment of individuals with ASD from early intervention through the school years.  Controversial practices will be reviewed and discussed.  Second, students will become familiar with guidelines for developing systems of support in human service organizations.  Students will learn to develop effective systems of staff training, support, and supervision.  Competency-based training will be discussed in detail, along with steps to ensure treatment integrity.  Students also will become familiar with peer review processes and methods of assessing consumer satisfaction.  Third, students will learn the standards for ethical and professional conduct as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB).  Students will discuss ethics in detail and learn to recognize potential ethical dilemmas that arise in daily educational and clinical practice.  Identification of pertinent ethical codes of conduct and resolution of ethical dilemmas will be reviewed.

This course partially fulfills coursework requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) in preparation for the examination for the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA). Every two years.


Educational Technology

EDU 513  New Media and Language Arts in the Elementary Classroom
This course will focus on how new media can be used to support student learning in the language arts classroom. Students will examine current and historical practices in the language arts classroom, and explore how these practices might shift with the arrival of new tools. Students will be asked to think critically about how and when new media should be used to support students. Particular focus will be given to the best practices in early elementary classrooms and the unique challenges and opportunities of working with this population in the digital age.

EDU 534  Redefining Literacy: Living and Learning in Online Environments

Today the term “literacy” no longer refers exclusively to the reading and writing of printed texts. Scholars, educators, and professionals recognize the importance of digital literacy to citizenship, education, information-sharing, and community-building. In response, this course will help deepen student’s understanding of a variety of digital writing technologies and to consider the ways in which our perceptions of self and others are mediated through these and other technologies. Over the course of the semester, students will craft and manage a digital identity at the same time that they learn about and experiment with a variety of web-based tools such as blogs, social networking sites, and micro-blogging applications. We will discuss the benefits and risks associated with digital foot-printing and will discuss the importance of self-literacy in a digital culture, particularly as it pertains to managing an online identity.  We will also explore the impact that evolving Internet technologies hold for the processes of reading and writing, identity construction, and community-building, as well as the extent to which we as educators must pay attention to these processes in order to stay relevant in an increasingly multimodal society. Varies.

EDU 546  Online Teaching & Learning: An Overview

How do teachers who excel in the classroom learn to translate that expertise into an online course that serves their students? What works well in online learning? This course offers an overview of online learning: its history, current status and future progress. Participants will also receive an introduction to learning theories and be introduced to different types of online teaching course design and educational technologies. Using case studies and a historical perspective of the evolution of online teaching, students will understand the challenges and advantages of establishing a distance learning course or program. The course will discuss course design, development, implementation, evaluation and the concept of building community. Varies.

EDU 547  Instructional Design for Online Course Development

This course presents an overview of curriculum development and an introduction to instructional design for online courses. Participants will learn to design and evaluate curriculum, develop instructional materials, assess student learning and measure instructional outcomes for use in online classes. Topics include preparation of course outlines and syllabi, development of lessons plans, design of evaluation instruments and an explanation of how learning objectives and evaluation strategies affect the selection of content and materials. Varies.

EDU 548 Encouraging Online Communication and Community to Support Learning

There are many free web tools available to educators and administrators who wish to foster community and communication on the web while increasing work efficiency. This course is based on theoretical frameworks for communication, collaboration, and cognition.  Course participants will develop knowledge and skills of using asynchronous communication technologies, social networking applications, and online community development tools. The course will allow participants to explore social presence on the web, develop strategies to encourage participation, conflict resolution, netiquette, and collaborative learning.  The course will be conducted through problem solving scenarios, simulations, and online discussions using a variety of web applications and frameworks. By the end of the course, students should have created a personally or professionally meaningful community to facilitate learning, peer support, or professional development. Varies.

EDU 568  Communication Tools for Teaching and Learning in Proficiency-Based Education

The goal of this course is to develop student-centered learning through technology integration and project-based approaches. Themes include: using technology effectively in the classroom to promote 21st century skills; identifying ways students and teachers can use technology to enhance learning through research, communication, collaboration, and productivity strategies and tools; providing hands-on learning and the creation of curricular units and assessments, which address state and national academic and technology standards; facilitating student-centered classrooms that encourage student self-direction and higher-order thinking. Varies.

EDU 569  Data and Information Tools for Teaching and Learning

Information Tools are technologies that allow humans to collect, organize, analyze and utilize information. These tools include, but are not limited to: databases, semantic networks (concept maps), spreadsheets, expert systems, microworlds, search tools, visualization tools, hypermedia, and geographic information systems. In this course, participants will explore the purpose, function, and usage of some of these tools, the philosophy and research behind their design and usage, as well as how information tools can best be utilized and assessed in the classroom to enhance teaching and learning. Varies.

EDU 571  Learning and Innovating with Digital Storytelling

This course explores the development of digital media, the instructional design process and how to integrate these tools with the teaching of media literacy. Participants examine the way that media (video, audio, images, etc.) can be used to enhance learning and develop the skills necessary to design, produce and evaluate the use of digital media in the classroom. Varies. 

EDU 572  Technology as a Change Agent

Many teachers with expertise in educational technology are relied upon to take leadership positions with technology integration/advocacy, professional development, grant writing, technology purchasing, etc. However, they seldom have expertise in how to be leaders and agents for change at the organizational level. Every school and situation is different, and there are no “silver bullets” or “one-size-fits-all” lists of rules, but knowing the right questions to ask can mean the difference between effective leadership and frustration. Varies.


Gifted and Talented Education

SED 530  Educational Principles for Learners Who are Gifted

This course introduces the participant to the education of gifted learners.  Topics to be presented:  conceptions of giftedness; myths and truths of gifted education; the necessity of gifted education; equitable identification of gifted learners from diverse populations; common cognitive and affective characteristics; highly gifted students; special populations of gifted learners; common social or emotional issues; necessary components of a gifted program; curriculum differentiation in the regular classroom; and acceleration vs. enrichment. Every fourth semester.

SED 531  Curriculum and Instruction for Learners Who Are Gifted

This course emphasizes the development of curricular and instructional opportunities to address characteristics and needs of the gifted child. Topics include: complexity and abstractness; differentiation from mainstream curriculum; modification of content, process, product, and learning environments; creative and critical thinking skills; the study of major ideas, issues, problems and themes across content areas; development of understanding of self and others; promotion of self-directed learning; career education; scope and sequence; and integration with district standards. Every fourth semester.

SED 532  Developing and Implementing Programs for Learners Who Are Gifted

This course prepares participants to build effective cohesive programs for gifted students, with direction provided by Maine Chapter 104 and the National Association for Gifted Children Program Standards. Topics include: program philosophy, goals and objectives; program models; identification procedures; curriculum and instruction; addressing atypical giftedness; grouping for instruction; teacher preparation; parent involvement; coordination between regular and special school programs; prevention of emotional problems; secondary vs. elementary programs; program advocacy and program evaluation. Every fourth semester.

SED 533  Teaching Critical and Creative Thinking in Gifted Programs and Classroom Settings

This course prepares teachers to increase the levels of critical and creative thinking in their classroom teaching.  Topics include critical thinking, creative thinking, and problem solving in education in regular classrooms, arts or music classrooms, and in the education of gifted students.  Participants will learn about assessment of critical thinking and creativity; social and cultural practices which facilitate or inhibit critical and creative thinking; and classroom practices which stimulate or inhibit critical and creative thinking in students and in teachers.  Specific research-based classroom strategies will be taught. Every fourth semester.


Math Leadership

EDU 529  Mathematics Leadership in K-12 Settings: Understanding and Implementing the Common Core State Standards

This course is the first of a four-course concentration designed to prepare educators to be leaders and specialists in mathematics education. It is a prerequisite for the other three courses which will focus on content, instruction and supervision.  The key content focus of this course is mathematics curriculum & assessment – specifically drawn from the Common Core State Standards for mathematics, the use of tactile and electronic technology, and the design for lessons, units and curriculum documentation.  Throughout each content strand there will be a focus on the strategies to create, adopt and execute professional development for teachers of mathematics. Every other year.

EDU 530  Mathematics Leadership in K-12 Settings: The Mathematics Content for Standards-Based Instruction

The content of this course is specific to the skills and concepts needed as an emergent mathematics leader/specialist/instructor.

The focus of this course will be:

  • An in-depth study of the Domain Progressions in the Common Core State Standards and the NCTM Standards and Connections in the NCTM Process Standards.
  • A research project that will examine the definition of mathematics content knowledge, the mathematics knowledge needed to teach effectively.
  • Development of a mathematics unit demonstrating math content, domain progressions and connections between mathematics topics.
  • A section of the course series portfolio that will show evidence of the student’s ability to use the learning in a professional development capacity as a mathematics leader.

Every other year.

EDU 531  Mathematics Pedagogical Knowledge: Effective Instructional Practices for Teaching the Common Core State Standards

The content of this course is specific to the skills and concepts needed to produce effective mathematics instruction.

The focus of this course will be:

  • Mathematics pedagogical knowledge needed for effective mathematics instruction.
  • Identification of mathematics resources needed for effective mathematics instruction.
  • The ability to critique classroom instruction for effectiveness.
  • The development of mathematics units.

Every other year.

EDU 532  Mathematics Leadership K-12: The Art of Mathematics Coaching and Supervision

The content of this course is specific to the skills and concepts needed as an emergent mathematics leader/specialist as they support the development of mathematics educators.

The focus of this course will be:

  • The strategies of clinical supervision,
  • The understanding of the aspects of coaching,
  • The ability to give targeted feedback, and
  • The understanding of being a teacher-leader in the culture of a school.

This work will give the enrollee the foundation for becoming a mathematics leader using mentoring and supervision. Every other year.


Methods Courses

EDU 524  Advanced Math Methods

This course is designed for elementary teachers who wish to increase both their math content knowledge and the methods they use to teach math content.  Participants will increase their content knowledge in the mathematics they teach; increase their understanding of how children learn mathematics; increase their understanding of themselves as a mathematicians ; increase their confidence as math teachers;  increase their familiarity with the variety of math resources and materials available;  increase their knowledge of the national math standards as well as the current research on math education;  increase their ability to create a constructivist mathematics curriculum. Varies.

EDU 561  Middle/Secondary Mathematics Education

This course includes methodological, curricular and professional issues in mathematics education, grades 6-12. Focus includes the following topics: Teaching and preparing for the Mass Customized Learning classroom, Response to Intervention structures and pedagogies; high school and middle school math content; use of materials; problem solving; use of technology; Common Core State Standards; professional development and leadership. Particular attention is given to the use of instructional technology, and the application of how-we-learn brain research in the mathematics classroom.  Every summer.

SED 560  Teaching Individuals with Exceptionalities in the General K-8 Classroom

This course is designed to help general education teachers realize the connections between a theoretical understanding of the nature and needs of diverse learners (mostly those with disabilities but including those from multicultural backgrounds, those at risk for school failure and those who are gifted and talented), and the practical collaborative practices, instructional methods and classroom behavior management strategies employed by teachers to ensure these students achieve their fullest academic and social potential.  Participants will have the opportunity at advanced levels to address The Maine Standards for Beginning Teachers, and CEC Standards and ITASC Principles for Special Education.  It meets K-8 certifications requirements in the state of Maine. This course is specifically designed to meet MDOE’s requirement for “Teaching Exceptional Students in the Regular Classroom” as part of a regular classroom teaching certificate.  Special Education teachers or those seeking Special Education certification should not enroll in this course. Varies.

SED 561 Teaching Individuals with Exceptionalities in the General 7-12 Classroom

This course is designed to help general education teachers realize the connections between a theoretical understanding of the nature and needs of diverse learners (mostly those with disabilities but including those from multicultural backgrounds, those at risk for school failure and those who are gifted and talented), and the practical collaborative practices, instructional methods and classroom behavior management strategies employed by teachers to ensure these students achieve their fullest academic and social potential.  Participants will have the opportunity at advanced levels to address The Maine Standards for Beginning Teachers, and CEC Standards and ITASC Principles for Special Education.  It meets 7-12 certifications requirements in the state of Maine. This course is specifically designed to meet MDOE’s requirement for “Teaching Exceptional Students in the Regular Classroom” as part of a regular classroom teaching certificate.  Special Education teachers or those seeking Special Education certification should not enroll in this course. Varies.


School Health

SHE 530  The Coordinated School Health Program

This course will assist practicing teachers in becoming familiar with the discipline of health education and the coordinated school health model. The course will trace the evolution of school health as well as examine present and future trends. Summer.

SHE 533 Designing Curriculum and Methods in School Health Education

This course will present practicing educators with existing curricula and methods used in developing school health curriculum. Theory and research-supported practices will examine areas of instruction and acquisition of resources. Summer.


Special Education Alternative Route to Certification (SPARC)

SED 503  Transition for Youth with Disabilities: From High School to Adult Life

This course prepares future special education teachers at the middle and secondary level to meet the transition requirements of IDEA by exploring issues and strategies for preparing adolescents and young adults with disabilities for the transition from school to adult life. We will explore these issues and strategies within the context of ecological models of human development. Students will: understand federal and state mandates for transition planning and historical perspectives of transition, explore and describe the five areas of transition, implement effective strategies for dealing with diversity and gender equity issues, implement key transition assessments and curricula, develop student-centered transition plans and demonstrate awareness of how community agencies can collaborate to improve outcomes for youth with disabilities. Spring.

SED 504  Collaborative Partnerships Among Individuals with Disabilities, Families, and Professionals

This course focuses on collaboration and teaming strategies among individuals with disabilities, their families, general and special educators, school psychologists, paraprofessionals, and other related service providers in inclusive school and community settings. Fall.

SED 505  Achieving High Standards with Universal Design and Assistive Technology

This course introduces students to the concept of universal design (UD) and technologies that provide educators with powerful ways to create flexible methods and materials to reach diverse learners. We’ll begin by exploring UD for professional productivity and then look at the use of UD for teaching and learning. Course participants also will investigate the use of assistive technology (AT) devices and services for children with disabilities.  A range of technology will be examined from “low tech” devices that are inexpensive or easily modified to “high tech” devices that are expensive and may be available on loan from specialized companies. Evaluation approaches and determination of appropriate uses of assistive technology will be discussed.  Methods and strategies for infusing assistive technology within infant/toddler playgroups, preschool, elementary, and secondary programs will be stressed. (Course participants will select the age group on which they wish to focus.) Each person is expected to bring previous professional knowledge and experiences regarding standards, practices, and instructional strategies. Spring.

SED 506  Assessment in Special Education

This course examines assessment practices for children and youth from 3-20 years and provides a variety of hands-on experiences in using various assessment approaches including observations, curriculum-based measurement, and standardized instruments. This course includes opportunities to construct and use both formative and summative assessments, emphasizing the links between pre-assessment, program planning and instruction, and monitoring progress. Each student will work with a focus child or youth in their area of specialization to gain practice in constructing, evaluating, and implementing informal assessments, evaluating formal assessments and interpreting assessment information for other educators and parents. Each student will build skills and knowledge in increasing cultural competence related to assessment practices. During this course, we also will explore a variety of current issues including universal design, testaccommodations, modifications, and assistive technology. Fall.

SED 507  Curriculum and Instructional Programming for Students with Disabilities

Students will explore basic principles of curriculum development and instructional programming for students with disabilities. Students will focus on how to develop clear instructional goals and objectives for Individual Education Plans and then how to construct daily instructional programs to accomplish these goals and objectives.  Students will explore current theory and practice regarding direct instruction as it applies to teaching reading and related skills. Spring.

SED 508  Classroom and Behavior Management of Students with Disabilities

Students will explore basic principles of classroom and behavior management from prevention of problems through the development of a variety of positive responses to chronic misbehavior in special education and regular classroom settings. Students will develop and conduct a number of classroom application projects designed to improve the behavior of individuals and groups of students. Students will also review current research on effective classroom and behavior management. Fall.

SED 509  Understanding and Applying Maine’s Special Education Rules and Regulations

Students will understand the federal and state laws and regulations that have an impact on how educators design and implement programs for students with special needs, how to organize and conduct pupil evaluation team meetings, how students become eligible for special education services, the procedural safeguards involved in all aspects of special education from referral to termination of services, develop skills in writing individual educational plans and linking these plans to daily instruction, record keeping, and evaluation, and become aware of some critical issues in special education. Summer.

SED 511  Mathematics Instruction for Students with Disabilities

This course, for practicing teachers, focuses on methods and strategies for introducing mathematical concepts to children and youth with disabilities, preschool through high school. Issues of concern, major curriculum thrusts, such as the Common Core State Standards, Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines, promising practices, methods to differentiate instruction, linking instruction and assessment, accommodations, modifications, and assistive technology are addressed in this course.  Approaches for children of different age levels from preschool through secondary are included. Students will select course projects appropriate for the setting or grade level in which they work.  Varies.

SED 513  Early Childhood Speech & Language: Development, Disorders & Interventions

This course is designed to introduce future early childhood special and general educators to the development of speech and language in young children. Content includes an overview of the ages and phases of typical speech and language development and the link between speech, language and literacy. We will explore disorders and delays in speech and language and learn about research-based techniques for assessment, identification and intervention. Summer.

SED 514  Literacy Development for All Students

This course introduces research-based approaches to (1) the assessment of and for literacy, and (2) the implementation of methods, materials, strategies, and techniques for supporting literacy learning of all individuals, including those with disabilities.  Although this course focuses on the special needs of individuals with disabilities or who are at risk, individuals taking this course will learn ways to address the needs of all students in grades Pre-kindergarten through 12 and adults who struggle to read and write or to improve their reading and writing skills. Topics include: assessment, print awareness, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, writing, and teaching reading and writing to English language learners. Opportunities will be provided for participants to explore independent learning on key course topics. Fall.

SED 515  Early Intervention: Working with Infants & Toddlers w/Disabilities & Their Families

This course addresses various aspects of early intervention services including teaming with families; understanding development and risk during prenatal, natal, and postnatal stages; studying models for working with young children with disabilities and their families in natural environments; and examining infant and toddler program development and curriculum. Students will identify and use current research to increase personal knowledge and skills, applying their findings to present work settings. Spring.

SED 516  Advanced Topics in Curriculum and Program Design: Mild to Moderate Disabilities

This course is designed for special education teachers who wish to extend their skill and understanding of selected curriculum and program design topics introduced in prior courses.  In consultation with the instructor, each participant will develop and conduct three instructional improvement projects.

Examples of such projects include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Implementing positive behavioral supports to improve the daily classroom behavior of a group of students;
  • Working with a team of teachers to improve a targeted area of student behavior or academic performance;
  • Analyzing current instructional practices for a specific group of students and then identifying and implementing newer instructional practices in response to identified needs.

Spring.

SED 517  Professional Ethics, Cultural Competence, and Evidence-based Practices in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education

This course examines professional and ethical practice within the range of delivery systems from early intervention to special education in community and school-based programs for children with disabilities, from birth to eight years of age, and their families.  Case studies increase understanding of various medical conditions and related care on family concerns and on child development and learning. Students examine and practice developmentally appropriate methods and strategies, as well as develop skills in effective supervision and evaluation of others.  Through the course, students engage in reflective inquiry regarding developing personal cultural competency.  Students identify and use current research to increase personal knowledge and skills, applying findings to present work settings. Summer. 

SED 518  Special Education Law

This course will provide prospective and practicing educators and school administrators with a working knowledge of relevant laws, policies, and regulations related to students with disabilities. Laws and regulations pertaining to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Maine special education regulations, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act will be discussed. Major course topics include Special Education eligibility and IEP development, student discipline, and curriculum access. The historical significance and practical application of laws affecting students with disabilities in school will be emphasized.  In particular, the focus of the course will be on making effective educational decisions for students with disabilities. Varies.


Other Courses

EDU 501  Content Area Literacy and the Common Core State Standards 

This graduate course in content literacy and the Common Core Standards (CCSS) is designed for practicing teachers. Content Area Literacy and the CCSS focuses on using literacy strategies that will help students comprehend and use critical thinking skills as students learn about effective approaches for teaching and assessing the process of literacy in the classroom.

Students will:

  • learn and implement literacy strategies that develop critical thinking;
  • implement “Writing to Learn” approaches to increase and enhance comprehension;
  • implement techniques that encourage students to take charge of their own literacy processes;
  • understand the difference between strong and weak examples of work and using this knowledge to increase their literacy achievement connecting reading, writing and thinking; and
  • engage in activities with their peers to sharpen their own understandings about literacy and the newest research on best practice.

EDU 506  Poverty and Education

The influence of income on the well-being of children, youth, and families is pervasive and persists throughout the lifespan and across generations.  An extensive and interdisciplinary literature has documented the widespread influence of family income on children’s cognitive, socioemotional, and physical development, as well as later vocational and educational success.  In this course, we will come to understand how poverty impacts education through a systems approach.  We will study theoretical perspectives from economics, sociology, psychology, and education for understanding how poverty affects children’s well-being as well as the multiple contexts children are growing up in.  We will also look at resilience and ways that children can avoid the negative outcomes of living in poverty.  This course will pay special attention to rural poverty and how it differs from urban poverty.  Application of theory and research to practice will be emphasized throughout this course. Varies.

EDU 538  Building a Customized, Standards-based Learning System

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of Mass Customized Learning and standards-based learning.

The focus of the course will be on:

  • the key components of a customized learning system including the structure of schools, curriculum, instruction, assessment and grading/reporting.
  • the importance of strategic planning and  how to develop a vision for a customized learning system.
  • the development of a plan for implementing the key characteristics (curriculum, instruction, assessment, grading, etc.) of a customized, standards-based system.

Varies. 

EDU 5381  Seminar in Leadership, Change, and Structures in a Customized Learning Environment

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of what effective leadership, change, and structural strategies look like within a customized learning model.

The focus of the course will be on:

  • an understanding of change theory and what it means in implementing second order change.
  • the structures that negatively impact the effective implementation of a standards-based, customized learning model and what changes are necessary to facilitate successful results.
  • problem solving and invention reasoning necessary for an organization to identify the changes necessary to successful implementation of customized learning.

Varies.

EDU 5382  Curriculum Instruction and Assessment in Customized Learning

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of what effective curriculum instruction and assessment looks like within a customized learning model.

The focus of the course will be on:

  • the importance of using a common instructional framework.
  • an understanding of formative feedback and its role in a standards-based customized learning classroom.
  • using a curriculum of learning goals, how to implement research-based best practices in instruction and assessment.
  • using and applying a taxonomy of learning to instructional lessons.
  • the structures and procedures that impact effective instruction and assessment practices.
  • motivational theory and how it relates to student engagement.
  • learner support structures that help learners track their own learning and make learning expectations and progress transparent to all learners and their parents.

This is a 6-credit graduate course, requiring extensive research, writing and application of research over two consecutive academic semesters. Varies.