UMF hosts Maine Short Film Festival 2017 featuring art professors’ winning video, Feb 2

FARMINGTON, ME  (January 19, 2017)—The University of Maine at Farmington is excited to announce that “Occasionally,” a short film by Dawn Nye and Katrazyna Randall, UMF associate professors of art, has been selected as a 2017 winning film by the Maine Film and Video Association.

Nye and Randall’s film, along with 13 other winning films, will be screened as part of the Maine Short Film Festival 2017 in the UMF Emery Community Arts Center at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 2.

The screening will feature a time for questions by the audience with filmmakers and jurors. Admission at the door is $5, $3 for UMF students with I.D.

“Occasionally” is based on the imagined experience of the sailors aboard the submarine Kursk, which sank in the Barents Sea in 2000. It explores the ideas of faith in a system, a structure, a relationship, a concept and the knowledge we believe we contain.

“Though our work is usually screened in gallery exhibitions and new media art festivals, we are delighted to have our video chosen by the Maine Film and Video Association to be screened with such great work from around the state,” said Nye.

Maine Short Film Festival posterAccording to the MFVA, the Maine Short Film Festival is a celebration of Maine, its land, its people and its creative soul. It highlights Maine artists, fishermen, boat builders, wilderness guides, transgender people and youth in all genres. The festival is touring 12 theaters from December 2016 through May 2017 throughout Maine.

The MFVA is a trade association made up of an active group of production companies, film and video professionals, TV stations, students, actors, musicians, writers, crew members, and others who are interested in working together to create better business opportunities and educational and networking opportunities for the people working in this industry in Maine.

For more info on the Maine Film and Video Association and each of the winning films can be found at http://www.mainefilm.org.

Sponsored by the UMF Emery Community Arts Center

More on the UMF Emery Community Arts Center

The Emery Community Arts Center is an innovative, experimental venue for the arts in Western Maine. It features an exciting 2,500-square-foot, 160-seat multipurpose performance space with dynamic vertical foldaway doors that open onto an outdoor performance area and a 1,600-square-foot Flex-Space gallery for traditional exhibits, new media and performance art. A dramatic interior corridor offers additional exhibition space and connects the center with the existing Alumni Theater. Designed by designLAB architects of Boston to complement the historic performance venues of Nordica Auditorium and Alumni Theater, the 15,000-square-foot center is the keystone for the arts complex on the UMF campus.

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Media Contact: Dawn Nye, UMF associate professor of art at dawn.nye@maine.edu or 207-778-7515

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at:
http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2017/01/RP167-028.jpg
Photo Credit: Submitted photo

UMF conservation geneticist explores threatened species and their chance of survival in Public Classroom talk, Jan 31

FARMINGTON, ME  (January 17, 2017)—With animal and plant species disappearing at an alarming rate, the University of Maine at Farmington is proud to feature a talk by Chris Brinegar, UMF adjunct associate professor in the natural sciences, entitled, “From the Redwood Forest to the Andes Mountains: The Adventures of a Conservation Geneticist.” In this talk, he will explain in lay terms how the story of a threatened species’ past is written in its DNA and how that information can be used to increase its chances of survival into the future.

This UMF Public Classroom lecture will take place at 6:30 p.m. with refreshments at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 31, in the UMF Emery Community Arts Center. It is free and open to the public.

Chris Brinegar, UMF adjunct associate professor in the natural sciences

Chris Brinegar, UMF adjunct associate professor in the natural sciences

A conservation geneticist, Brinegar has studied several threatened plant species in two of the world’s most stunning yet highly-impacted forest habitats—the redwood forests of California and the Andean cloud forests of Ecuador and Peru. Half field biologist and half forensic scientist, the conservation geneticist uses modern tools of DNA fingerprinting and analysis to characterize the genetic health, taxonomic classification, and evolutionary histories of at-risk species. Such data can play a crucial role in guiding conservation decisions.

Half of the Earth’s primary forests have been cut since the beginning of agriculture-based civilization. At the current rates of logging and agricultural expansion it is estimated that 40 percent of the remaining forests will be gone within 20 years.

A major focus of conservation biology is to identify forest species at risk of extinction so that management plans can be put in place to increase their numbers and save their remaining habitat. An important additional goal is to conserve the genetic diversity of threatened species.

A two-time senior Fulbright scholar in Nepal and Ecuador, Brinegar was the former director of the Conservation Genetics Laboratory at San José State University in California before coming to UMF in 2006.

The UMF Public Classroom Series is sponsored by the UMF Office of the President.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized public liberal arts college, UMF enjoys a 150-year tradition of providing a quality academic experience combined with the personal attention and close student / faculty collaboration that help prepare all students to be successful. Rooted in a tradition of teacher preparation, UMF offers top quality programs in the arts and sciences, teacher preparation, and business and pre-professional studies. UMF is located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region and is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

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Media Contact: Chris Brinegar, UMF associate professor of biology, at chris.brinegar@maine.edu or 207-778-7361

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at:
http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2017/01/RP167-027.jpg
Photo Credit: Submitted photo
Photo Caption:  Chris Brinegar, UMF adjunct associate professor in the natural sciences.

UMF student intern creates city policies for Maine municipality

Haley Jaramillo, UMF student intern for the City of Gardiner, prepares to present new city policies to the City Council.

Haley Jaramillo, UMF student intern for the City of Gardiner, prepares to present new city policies to the Gardiner City Council.

Haley Jaramillo, a UMF senior, recently attended a Gardiner City Council meeting—not as a member of the audience, but to present a number of new city policies she wrote for the central Maine municipality. Jaramillo spent her summer writing and revising Gardiner City policies as part of an internship the city offers, reported the Kennebec Journal. A student majoring in environmental planning and policy, the high-level internship gave her a front-row seat to a profession based on helping people in her home community. “I surprised myself with the knowledge I had and the input I was able to give,” said Jaramillo. Scott Morelli, Gardiner city manager, said cultivating the interest of students like Haley is critical. “We were lucky to have her,” he said.

Kennebec Journal

Vibrant exhibit by visual artist Hélène Farrar launches UMF Emery Community Arts Center’s spring schedule

FARMINGTON, ME  (January 10, 2017)—A vibrant solo exhibit by visual artist Hélène Farrar launches the UMF Emery Community Arts Center’s spring schedule. The show, “What We Carry,” runs from Jan. 17 to March 19, and features an opening reception from 5-7 p.m., Friday, Jan. 20. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

“Balance” by Hélène Farrar

“Balance” by Hélène Farrar

Farrar’s exhibit, “What We Carry” shows that we are more complicated than we think we are. We are even more complicated than even the stories we tell. We can’t see that someone next to us might be carrying with them an entire room or an elephant-sized amount of trauma, an isolating living situation or viewpoint, anger, a deep (dis)connection to others, and a personal or familial history of significance.

But revealing or attempting to engage with others about the depth of our human nature collectively and individually can place us into vulnerability. Through layers of mark, textures, patterns, humor and “stuff” these works hope to begin a conversation about our duality while also exploring larger themes including migration, human relationships, differences in perspective, political and social climate and personal search.

This exhibit consists of twenty plus paintings in encaustic (molten beeswax paint) and sculptures of various scale, including a 3 by 6 foot carved wooden elephant. Heat is used throughout the encaustic process, from melting the beeswax and varnish to fusing the layers of wax. The medium can be used alone for its transparency or adhesive qualities or used pigmented.

Farrar using the encaustic process.

Farrar using the encaustic process.

Farmington native Farrar teaches and makes her work just down the road in Manchester. Both her mother, also an artist, and her stepfather, taught at UMF. She has fond first memories as a child of Farmington and UMF’s Alumni Theater and art studios.

“Having my first Farmington exhibit at UMF’s Emery Community Arts Center is incredibly emotional for me,” said Farrar. “It feels very much like coming home.”

An artist and art educator, she has taught and worked in the visual arts for twenty years while actively teaching and exhibiting in commercial, nonprofit and universities in New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Italy and England. Farrar was most recently featured in a summer exhibition “Vision + Verse” curated by Anne Zills at the University of New England.

Her paintings have been accepted into curated exhibits at the Creative Arts Workshop of New Haven, the Saco Museum, the University of New England and Twiggs Gallery in New Hampshire. Farrar is represented by the Stable Gallery in Damariscotta, Archipelago Fine Arts in Rockland, the Eastport Breakwater Gallery and the Center for Maine Craft in West Gardiner.

Farrar has a BA in Studio Art from the University of Maine and a Masters of Fine Art Degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College in Vermont.

She currently owns and operates her own private art school in Maine out of her “Farmhouse” studio, where she holds varied workshops and classes.  Hélène is a great lover of people, dogs, culture, music, podcasts, and birds.  She can be often found enjoying the Maine outdoors skiing, biking, or walking her dog. She lives and works in Manchester with her ten-year-old daughter Olympia, engineer husband Stan and dog Buddy.

This exhibit is sponsored by the UMF Emery Community Arts Center.

More on the Emery Community Arts Center on the UMF Campus

The Emery Community Arts Center is an innovative, experimental venue on the UMF campus for the arts in Western Maine. It features an exciting 2,500-square-foot, 160-seat multipurpose performance space with dynamic vertical foldaway doors that open onto an outdoor performance area and a 1,600-square-foot Flex-Space gallery for traditional exhibits, new media and performance art. A dramatic interior corridor offers additional exhibition space and connects the center with the existing Alumni Theater.

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Media contact: Jayne Decker, UMF instructor and director of the UMF Emery Community Arts Center at 207-778-7319, or jdecker@maine.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at
http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2017/01/RP167-026A.jpg
Photo Caption: “Balance” by Hélène Farrar

http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2017/01/RP167-026B.jpg
Photo Caption: Farrar using the encaustic process.

UMF Fitness and Recreation Center Offering Swim Clinic, Dec. 19-23

FARMINGTON, ME  (December 13, 2016)—The UMF Fitness and Recreation Center is running a high level Swim Stroke Clinic for intermediate to advanced swimmers. The clinic is open to the public and classes will be held at the University of Maine at Farmington FRC daily Monday, Dec. 19 through Friday, Dec. 23. Session I is from 7-8:30 a.m. and session II is  from 6-7:30 p.m.

This program is designed to provide highly technical training in the basic swim strokes of freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly. Participants should understand the basic concepts of the four strokes, have lap swimming experience and be able to swim 500 yards in 11-14 minutes.

Anyone interested can participate by the session or for the entire week. The cost for FRC members is $15 per session or $50 per week. The cost for non-members is $30 per session or $100 per week.

Joe Fowler, Farmington native and coach to the Olympic Development program for Team Santa Monica will be coaching the clinic. He will also be available for private lessons Dec. 26-30.

To register or for more information, contact Jennifer Pageot, UMF FRC assistant director and aquatic, health and safety educator at jennifer.pageot@maine.edu or 207-778-7437. You can also visit the website at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/frc/aquatics/umf-swim-clinic/

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Rehabilitation Services students participate in Job Club program

UMF Rehabilitation Services pilot program participants

UMF Rehabilitation Services pilot program participants

UMF students in the Rehabilitation Services Program are participating in a pilot program to help area high school students with disabilities explore their options after graduation. UMF students in the Job Club program serve as role models for Jay and Turner high school students as they discuss topics such as employment and educational opportunities, resume and interview skills, problem solving and coping skills.  “Working with kids and being a role model to them is part of who I am,” said Ian Vail, UMF junior majoring in Rehabilitation Services. Based on the positive results, plans are underway to expand the Job Club to other schools next semester, said a recent Sun Journal article.

Sun Journal
Daily Bulldog

UMF Wilson undergraduate research program names fall 2016 scholars and fellows

FARMINGTON, ME  (November 28, 2016)—Eight University of Maine at Farmington students have been named as Fall 2016 UMF Michael D. Wilson Scholars and Fellows. This competitive, campus-wide research program provides project funding to top student scholars as they pursue the highest level of undergraduate research.

The UMF Wilson Program names student awardees twice a year, including single-semester scholars and year-long fellows. Student researchers are individually sponsored by faculty mentors and supported at every stage of their research. Faculty mentors assist with proposal development, research methodology, project presentation and continuing follow-up on pre-professional and post-graduate opportunities.

“This research program is a perfect pairing of our students’ unique academic interests with their professors’ dedicated mentorship and guidance,” said Kathryn A. Foster, UMF president. “That partnership is at the heart of the Wilson Program and the overall UMF learning experience.”

This semester’s student researchers are exploring topics from mathematical group theory to literature and magic.

UMF Fall 2016 Wilson Scholars and FellowsThe Fall 2016 UMF Wilson Fellows are Brigid Chapin (Winthrop), Eli Kidson (Farmington), and Cassie Scott (Somerset, Mass.).

Fall 2016 UMF Wilson Scholars include, Jamie Austin (Springvale), Joseph Needle (Northfield, Ver.), Ben Rodriguez (Readfield), Richard Southard (Gray) and Kristen Tarr (Dyer Brook).

The Wilson program was originally established by Michael and Susan Angelides, of Columbia, Conn., in honor of their good friend and UMF alumnus Michael D. Wilson, class of 1976.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at:

http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2016/11/RP167-024.jpg
Photo Credit: UMF photo
Photo Caption:  Left to right, front row: Joseph Needle, Eli Kidson, Richard Southard, Brigid Chapin. Back row: Ben Rodriguez, Kristen Tarr, Cassie Scott, Jamie Austin.

UMF Mainely Outdoors reaches out to local high school

UMF Mainely OutdoorsMainely Outdoors, UMF’s four-season outdoor recreation and excursion program is reaching out to the local high school helping to provide students with equipment for both hands-on work with composites and a little fun in the great outdoors. According to a recent Sun Journal article, the UMF program is working closely with the Mt. Blue High School composite manufacturing class to make sure the UMF equipment is in top shape while also giving high school students valuable experience in composite repair.  Andrew Willihan, Mainely Outdoors coordinator, said the UMF program offers free gear rental to both UMF and Mt. Blue students. At the beginning of the school year, the UMF program provided equipment to help more than 30 students in Mt. Blue’s YETI Outing Club learn canoeing and kayaking skills.

Sun Journal

UMF Community Chorus presents concert for the holiday season, Dec. 4

FARMINGTON, ME  (November 21, 2016)—The UMF Community Chorus, under the leadership of Bruce McInnes, music director, and accompanied by Patricia Hayden, organist, will present a concert of music for the holiday season at 3:30 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 4 at Old South Church, 227 Main Street in Farmington.

The program will include Concerted Chorale Movements from several Bach Cantatas, Franz Schubert’s delightful “Mass in G” and Benjamin Britten’s Cantata “Rejoice in the Lamb.”

Soloists in the Schubert Mass will be Isabelle and Phoebe Rogers, Michaela Carney and Kathryn Sytsma, sopranos; Daniel Woodward, tenor and Paul Stancioff, baritone. The soloists in “Rejoice in the Lamb” will be Isabelle Rogers, soprano; Elaine Eadler, alto; Daniel Woodward, tenor and Cole Williams, baritone.

In addition, the audience will be invited to join the chorus in singing favorite carols of the holiday season.

Admission to the concert is $8 for adults and $6 for seniors.  There is no admission charge for students under 18 and any UMF student with I.D.

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UMF Emery Community Arts Center presents an evening of experimental music, Dec 1

FARMINGTON, ME  (November 21, 2016)—The Emery Community Arts Center on the University of Maine at Farmington campus is proud to present an evening of experimental music at 7:15 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016.

The program is under the direction of Gustavo Aguilar, UMF associate professor of experimental performance and N.B.Aldrich, University of Maine faculty member and installation and performance artist. It includes works by contemporary composers Yoko Ono, Pauline Oliveros and Cornelius Cardew and is performed by students of the University of Maine at Farmington Experimental Performance Group and the University of Maine Intermedia MFA program.

The evening revolves around works that promote the idea of music as an opportunity for individual and social meditation and for performance as an opportunity to create community. This concert is part of ongoing collaboration of the University of Maine and University of Maine at Farmington experimental performance programs and the UMF Student Art Show.

This presentation is sponsored by the UMF Department of Visual and Performing Arts and is free and open to the public.

For more information, please contact Aguilar at gustavo.aguilar@maine.edu.

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