Mainebiz spotlights UMF as it puts the ‘hire’ in higher education

UMF President Kathryn A. Foster

UMF President Kathryn A. Foster

UMF was recently featured by Mainebiz for “putting the ‘hire’ in higher education. The Maine business news publication touted Farmington’s success at giving students a leg up in their career aspirations through a focus on academics and experiential learning. Students in environmental planning and policy, teacher education, alpine operations and actuarial science are but a few examples of how internships and real-world experience help students be successful in and out of the classroom.

Mainbiz

One-of-a-kind UMF Math Coaching Project receives $174K grant

Left to right) Shannon Larsen and Sandra Macarthur, UMF education faculty and staff members, announce a $174,848 grant the UMF Maine Mathematics Coaching Project received from the Maine Department of Education’s Math and Science Partnership Project.

(Left to right) Shannon Larsen and Sandra Macarthur, UMF faculty and staff members, announce grant UMF received from the Maine Department of Education.

The UMF Maine Mathematics Coaching Project, a unique offering that trains math coaches to help educators with new instructional strategies, has received a $174,848 grant from the Maine Department of Education’s Math and Science Partnership Project. The UMF MMCP is the only one in Maine and one of only a handful nationally that requires participation by both teachers and district administrators, according to the Morning Sentinel. The grant funds will help K-8 educators and their districts strengthen teaching and learning in mathematics with the goal of increasing the math proficiency of Maine students. Twenty-nine educators are currently participating in two, two-year cohorts with a third cohort starting this June.

Morning Sentinel
Daily Bulldog
Sun Journal

UMF volunteers take Read to ME challenge to W.G. Mallet School

UMF volunteers in Read to ME challengeMore than 60 students, faculty and staff from the University of Maine at Farmington, including President Kathryn A. Foster standing next to Chompers the beaver mascot, participated in the Read to ME challenge at W.G. Mallett School in Farmington, as reported by the Daily Bulldog. Organizer Kathryn Will-Dubyak, elementary education professor, said volunteers read to students in kindergarten, first and second grades. The event was part of the statewide Maine Department of Education’s February challenge, Read to ME.

Daily Bulldog

UMF Alpine Operations Program in high gear

UMF Alpine OperationsUMF students in the Alpine Operations Certificate Program are in high gear as they kick off the 2017 snow sports season. As featured on WMTW 8’s nightlynews, the popular UMF program has students learning the business, management and recreational aspects of the industry from the classroom to the slopes. In addition, Alpine Ops students manage and instruct UMF’s highly successful Snowcats children’s learn-to-ski program at nearby Titcomb Mountain. “The experiences I’ve had with UMF and the Alpine Ops Program have given me the confidence and the fundamentals needed to run an organization,” said UMF student J.D. Evans.

WMTW 8

UMF students obtain $5,000 grant for local homeless shelter

Students taking Kelly Bentley, UMF community health professor’s, resource management and grant writing class were thrilled to learn their efforts to help the local homeless shelter proved successful. After months of research and meetings with the Skowhegan Savings Bank, the students were able to secure a grant that will help run a much-needed, 11-week daytime educational program at the shelter. According to the Portland Press Herald, the program will provide a safe, warm place for the families in need of the temporary shelter. “Farmington is such a close-knit community that we feel like the homeless people are also part of this community,” said student Sawyer-Boulette, “If it was any one of us, we assume that people would help us, too.”

Portland Press Herald
Morning Sentinel
Sun Journal
Daily Bulldog
The Washington Times
WABI 5

Winning film by UMF art professors to be screened at Maine Short Film Festival 2017

Scene from winning film "Occasionally."

Scene from winning film “Occasionally.”

“Occasionally,” a short film by University of Maine Farmington associate art professors Dawn Nye and Katrazyna Randall, has been selected as a 2017 winning film by the Maine Film and Video Association. Nye and Randall’s film, along with 13 other winning films, will be screened as part of the Maine Short Film Festival 2017 in the UMF Emery Community Arts Center on Thursday, Feb. 2. “Though our work is usually screened in gallery exhibitions and new media art festivals, we are delighted to have our video chosen by the Maine Film and Video Association to be screened with such great work from around the state,” Nye said.

Sun Journal
Daily Bulldog
Journal Tribune
The News Tribune

UMF student intern creates city policies for Maine municipality

Haley Jaramillo, UMF student intern for the City of Gardiner, prepares to present new city policies to the City Council.

Haley Jaramillo, UMF student intern for the City of Gardiner, prepares to present new city policies to the Gardiner City Council.

Haley Jaramillo, a UMF senior, recently attended a Gardiner City Council meeting—not as a member of the audience, but to present a number of new city policies she wrote for the central Maine municipality. Jaramillo spent her summer writing and revising Gardiner City policies as part of an internship the city offers, reported the Kennebec Journal. A student majoring in environmental planning and policy, the high-level internship gave her a front-row seat to a profession based on helping people in her home community. “I surprised myself with the knowledge I had and the input I was able to give,” said Jaramillo. Scott Morelli, Gardiner city manager, said cultivating the interest of students like Haley is critical. “We were lucky to have her,” he said.

Kennebec Journal

Rehabilitation Services students participate in Job Club program

UMF Rehabilitation Services pilot program participants

UMF Rehabilitation Services pilot program participants

UMF students in the Rehabilitation Services Program are participating in a pilot program to help area high school students with disabilities explore their options after graduation. UMF students in the Job Club program serve as role models for Jay and Turner high school students as they discuss topics such as employment and educational opportunities, resume and interview skills, problem solving and coping skills.  “Working with kids and being a role model to them is part of who I am,” said Ian Vail, UMF junior majoring in Rehabilitation Services. Based on the positive results, plans are underway to expand the Job Club to other schools next semester, said a recent Sun Journal article.

Sun Journal
Daily Bulldog

UMF Mainely Outdoors reaches out to local high school

UMF Mainely OutdoorsMainely Outdoors, UMF’s four-season outdoor recreation and excursion program is reaching out to the local high school helping to provide students with equipment for both hands-on work with composites and a little fun in the great outdoors. According to a recent Sun Journal article, the UMF program is working closely with the Mt. Blue High School composite manufacturing class to make sure the UMF equipment is in top shape while also giving high school students valuable experience in composite repair.  Andrew Willihan, Mainely Outdoors coordinator, said the UMF program offers free gear rental to both UMF and Mt. Blue students. At the beginning of the school year, the UMF program provided equipment to help more than 30 students in Mt. Blue’s YETI Outing Club learn canoeing and kayaking skills.

Sun Journal

UMF provides perspective on presidential election

Roy Van TilRoy Van Til, retired UMF professor of economics, provided a new understanding to the recent presidential election with a presentation on “Economic Factors in Presidential Elections.” Covered by Bangor’s CBS affiliate WABI 5, Van Til’s talk was aimed at giving people in attendance a respite from the nastiness of the campaign season, and providing an unbiased look at how past elections have affected the economy. “A lot of the differences that people think exist or have been told exist don’t really exist. It really doesn’t make a huge difference in terms of economics,” said Van Til.

WABI 5