UMF and Shiretown Bookers feature historical talk by Dean Emeritus Rob Lively, Jan. 31

FARMINGTON, ME (January 22, 2016)—The University of Maine at Farmington and the Shiretown Bookers—community friends of UMF’s Mantor Library—are pleased to present a talk by Rob Lively, retired UMF dean and associate provost, on a collection of historical documents that shed new light on the nineteenth century view of the end of the world.

UMF Dean Emeritus Rob LivelyThe story of the discovery and the implications of these remarkable documents will be presented at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 31, in room C23 in the Roberts Learning Center at 270 Main Street, on the UMF campus. This event is free and open to the public.

Historically, groups that anticipate the imminent Second Coming of Christ (Millenarians) have been made up of people lacking power, money and influence in this life. They looked forward to the time when the roles would be reversed, and they would live with Christ during his millennial reign—to the exclusion of all others.

Lively’s talk will explore a cache of documents of the Catholic Apostolic Church of nineteenth century England—a religious group composed of members of Parliament, landed gentry and aristocracy—that didn’t fit that profile.

The Shiretown Bookers, the community friends of Mantor Library, are a group of collectors and booklovers who provide exhibitions and lectures throughout the year with the goal of fostering the relationship between the university and the community.

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Contact: Reid Byers – reidbyers@gmail.com or 609-306-1002

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2016/01/RP156-037.jpg
Photo Credit: UMF photo
Photo Caption:  UMF Dean Emeritus Rob Lively

UMF Art Gallery presents “Hot Dust” exhibit by artist Jesse Potts, Jan 28-Mar 6

FARMINGTON, ME (January 20, 2016)—The University of Maine at Farmington kicks off the semester with an exhibit at the UMF Art Gallery by Jesse Potts, sculptor, artist and UMF assistant professor of art. “Hot Dust” is a collection of sculptures, prints, and animated installations and is on display from Jan. 28 through March 6. Free and open to the public, the exhibit will feature an opening reception 5-7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 28.

Digital print by Jesse Potts, artist

“(X)” digital print by Jesse Potts

The works in this exhibit explore the intersection of place, memory and time. They emerged from a meditation on the meaning of “home” and the ways that “home” shifts based on one’s perception of its permanence or transience. In the studio, the artist questions how the memory of an experience is organized through its relationship to a place and time. How might those memories be mutated, overwritten or erased by time?

A re-occurring element in this body of work is the reference to the road either through the use of maps or through the reference to the solid double yellow-line bisecting lanes of traffic. Potts is attracted to the road in not only its symbolic reference to mobility and to the line between two points, but also its coded system of rules. Some works contain momentum, some works are the residue of momentum and some remain lost in between.

Potts’ sculpture and installations combine constructed and found objects, printed image, video, light, performance and sound. Kinetic and interactive components within the work link time-based functions to action and outcome. The work itself exists as the residual matter of a meditation on the relationship between time, sensory perception, culture and mortality.

He has been an artist in residence at the I-A-M residency, Berlin, Germany, The European Ceramic Work Centre’s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands, and Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris, France. He has received grants from The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Vermont Arts council, The Kansas City Artist Coalition and VCU School of the Arts.  His work has been included in solo and group exhibitions both nationally and internationally and reviewed by Hyperallergic and the New York Times.

Potts completed his MFA at Virginia Commonwealth University.

This UMF Art Gallery exhibition is sponsored by the Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry. The gallery is located at 246 Main Street in Farmington, behind the Admissions Office. Gallery hours are Tuesdays–Sundays, 12-4 p.m. and by appointment.  For more information, or to make an appointment please contact Sarah Maline at maline@maine.edu or 207-778-1062.

More about the UMF Art Gallery

The UMF Art Gallery is dedicated to bringing contemporary art and artists to campus and the regional community. In its focus on innovative and challenging new work, the gallery reinforces the academic vision of the university and the Department of Sound, Performance and Visual Inquiry in celebrating art as a powerful agent of community and cultural identity. The gallery develops interdisciplinary educational opportunities for students and community and works with local schools to integrate art into their curricula.

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 Media Contact: Jesse Potts, UMF assistant professor of art, at jesse.potts@maine.edu

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2016/01/RP156-036.jpg
Photo Credit: Submitted photo
Image:( X )” digital print

UMF Alpine Ops on "Maine Calling"

UMF student skiiersMPBN’s “Maine Calling” recently broadcast an industry update on skiing in Maine this winter season. UMF’s new Alpine Operations Certificate Program led by Scott Hoisington with years of four-season resort experience, was highlighted in the podcast by Greg Sweetser, executive director of Ski Maine, as a program to look into for anyone interested in on-mountain internships and in-depth involvement in the ski and snowboard industry.

Ski Maine podcast on MPBN. UMF mentioned at 19:28 (MP3)

UMF faculty member to be featured speaker at international biosciences conference in Nepal

FARMINGTON, ME (January 7, 2016)—Chris Brinegar, adjunct associate professor in the University of Maine at Farmington Division of Natural Sciences, has been invited to be the keynote speaker for the Biodiversity & Natural Products session of the International Conference on Biosciences and Biotechnology held in Kathmandu, Nepal, Feb. 4-6.

UMF faculty member Chris BrinegarBrinegar’s research specialty is plant phylogeography, the study of the geographic distribution of genetic lineages in plant populations. The genetic data resulting from this research can shed light on plant species evolution, assess biodiversity and help identify populations in need of conservation.

His talk will summarize his genetics research on Cinchona officinalis that he conducted during a recent Fulbright fellowship in Ecuador. Tree species in the genus Cinchona are a rich source of quinine, an anti-malarial drug, and were among the first plants in the New World to suffer from overexploitation after Spanish colonization. Brinegar’s lecture will also describe how genetic studies can guide conservation approaches for threatened and endangered plant species which produce commercially important natural products.

Brinegar has taught ecology, environmental science and biochemistry at UMF since 2006. He has twice been named a Fulbright Scholar to pursue his teaching and research: in the Biotechnology Department at Kathmandu University in Nepal in 2008 and at the Technical University of Loja in the Andes Mountains of southern Ecuador in 2014.

He received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Notre Dame, M.S. in food chemistry from Cornell University, and Ph.D. in Agronomy from the University of Wisconsin. Following post-doctoral training in plant molecular biology at the Plant Cell Research Institute in California, he joined the faculty of the Biology Department at San Jose State University in 1987 where he taught molecular biology, cell biology, botany and evolution. His research there focused on the population genetics of coastal and forest plants of northern California, including coast redwoods.

The ICBB conference organizing partners include the Asian Federation of Biotechnology, The World Academy of Sciences and the Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized public liberal arts college, UMF enjoys a 150-year tradition of providing a quality academic experience combined with the personal attention and close student / faculty collaboration that help prepare all students to be successful. Rooted in a tradition of teacher preparation, UMF offers top quality programs in the arts and sciences, teacher preparation, and business and pre-professional studies. UMF is located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region and is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

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Media Contact: Chris Brinegar, UMF adjunct associate professor of biology, at chris.brinegar@maine.edu

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2016/01/RP156-035.jpg
Photo Credit: Submitted photo

UMF student “recovers” prepared food for local homeless shelter

UMF student Catherine Dufault

Catherine Dufault, a sustainability-minded UMF student majoring in environmental planning and policy, is working to “recover” excess, prepared food from the campus dining service to help meet critical food needs at a local homeless shelter. Dufault, according to a recent Kennebec Journal article, established a UMF chapter of the Food Recovery Network, a national charity that engages students on college campuses to fight food waste and hunger. With this new organization in place, excess fresh prepared food is packaged by campus food service and transported by students to the Western Maine Homeless Outreach in Farmington. In addition to her work with the Food Recovery Network, Dufault is also working to establish a UMF food closet for needy students.

Kennebec Journal
Sun Journal
Daily Bulldog
Morning Sentinel

UMF employee Lois King named Hospice Volunteer of the Year

FARMINGTON, ME (December 15, 2015)—Lois King, UMF employee since 1979 and volunteer with Beacon Hospice in Augusta, has been selected from hundreds of nominations across 34 states as Hospice Volunteer of the Year. Kelly Herlihy, volunteer coordinator at the Augusta facility, an Amedisys company, made the memorable announcement at UMF’s University Store where King is employed.

King started volunteering for the hospice organization several years ago after her mother, a dedicated volunteer herself, required hospice care. A great lover of poetry, her mother had an extensive collection of poems she would share with friends and loved ones in her personal correspondence.

Wanting to see her mother’s caring legacy continue, King started a Bereavement Poetry program with Beacon Hospice where she shares her mother’s poetry to cheer and console bereaved family and friends of hospice patients.Lois King receives award.

“Lois is not your typical direct care volunteer,” said Herlihy in her nomination letter of King for the hospice award. “What a great way to honor and carry her mother’s traditions with her than to use her mom’s stationary to send a small token from the heart to bereaved families.”

King received a commemorative plaque, flowers, and a $2,500 check. Kathryn A. Foster, UMF president, also gave her a book of poetry by Wes McNair, Maine Poet Laureate.

In addition to her poetry program, King gave over 100 hours creating more than 25 Chart a Life boards for individuals in hospice care. These collages of patients’ personal experiences and things they loved help care givers get to know and interact with a patient and are given to the family afterwards as a keepsake.

“Hospice is a wonderful organization,” said King. “They provide comfort, companionship and support for patients and their families when they need it the most. I love what I’m doing.”

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2015/12/RP156-034.jpg

Photo Credit: UMF photo

Photo Caption:  Lois King receives Volunteer of the Year award.

UMF 10th annual Giving Tree helps community have joyful holiday

FARMINGTON, ME (December 11, 2015)—As Christmas gets closer, the University of Maine at Farmington’s University Store is once again hosting its annual Holiday Giving Tree. In its tenth consecutive year, the UMF Giving Tree is an opportunity for members of the campus and community to donate items to children and families in need to help ensure everyone has a joyful holiday.

New, unwrapped clothes, shoes, winter wear, toys, books, personal items, etc., from infant to adult, are gratefully accepted. They can be donated at UMF’s University Store located at 238 Main Street in Farmington until Friday, Dec. 18. The store is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday thru Friday.

RP156-033A

(Left to right) UMF University Store staff members Barbara Lambert and Lois King hold Santa’s list for the Holiday Giving Tree.

This holiday giving tradition is in partnership with the Franklin County Children’s Task Force, a local non-profit devoted to strengthening Franklin County families and advocating for and providing services that promote healthy children and families. Store staff works closely with members of the FCCTF to fill the holiday tree with tags that have the Christmas wishes of children and families throughout the area. Members of the campus and local community are invited to take a tag to fulfill special requests.

“It’s always so heartwarming to see the overwhelming response,” said Lois King, longtime UMF University Store employee. “Many of our students have been involved with similar holiday charitable efforts in high school and are so excited to be involved and give back.”

Student and community organizations, campus faculty, staff and entire UMF departments generously contribute to the annual charitable event. This year staff from UMF’s Merrill Center has adopted an entire family’s requests and members of the Country Square Quilting Club from the Jay and Wilton area have contributed 27 handmade quilts.

Unwrapped gifts are picked up at the University Store by task force staff and will be distributed by members of the Maine Family Home Visitors prior to the holiday.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized public liberal arts college, UMF enjoys a 150-year tradition of providing a quality academic experience combined with the personal attention and close student / faculty collaboration that help prepare all students to be successful. Rooted in a tradition of teacher preparation, UMF offers top quality programs in the arts and sciences, teacher preparation, and business and pre-professional studies. UMF is located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region and is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

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Media contact: Mary Ellen Martin, director of store services at UMF, 207-778-7325, or martinme@maine.edu

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at: http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2015/12/RP156-033A.jpg

Photo Caption: (Left to right) UMF University Store staff members Barbara Lambert and Lois King hold Santa’s list for the Holiday Giving Tree.

Photo Credit: UMF photos

UMF student dedicated to health education named ‘Outstanding Future Professional’ by Maine organization

FARMINGTON, ME (December 10, 2015)—University of Maine at Farmington student Kayla McGee was recently honored as an Outstanding Future Professional by the Maine Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. She was one of only five Maine college students recognized at the organization’s annual conference in Rockland.

A senior from South Paris, McGee is majoring in community health education at UMF with a school health concentration. She was selected by MAHPERD for this award for her academic achievement, campus and community involvement, leadership qualities and professional standing. As part of her award, she was selected by the executive board as one of two award recipients to represent Maine at the Eastern District Annual Conference in the spring.UMF student Kayla McGee

First interested in nursing, McGee discovered a passion for health education and helping young people make healthy decisions to live a healthy lifestyle. Having lost her best friend in high school in a car accident, she is committed to helping students see how their choices can make a huge difference in their health and quality of life.

“I want to be able to educate young people on how to prevent problems in their lives at an age when they’re most vulnerable,” said McGee.

Just having completed her student teaching at Oxford Hills High School, McGee finds helping students live a healthy lifestyle extremely rewarding.  “I want to make sure they are all taken care of,” said McGee. Her educational interests include disease and drug prevention, suicide prevention, human sexuality and the prevention of unintentional injuries.

“Kayla has a natural ability to connect with people and interact with students in a positive, meaningful way,” said Stephanie Swan, UMF lecturer in community health education. “Her care and concern for the well-being of young people is really inspirational and hopefully helps them to care for themselves at an age when it can make the biggest difference in their lives.”

McGee serves as the student representative on the MAHPERD board. In addition to her work with the nonprofit organization, she is a member of Eta Sigma Gamma, the national honor society for health education professionals.

As a sophomore at UMF she served as secretary of the UMF student club for sexual awareness. She is graduating from UMF in December.

More about the UMF Community Health Education Program

Learning by doing is the keystone of the Community Health Education program. Classroom-based research, on campus work opportunities, and service learning projects are led by faculty with a broad range of specialties including nutrition, stress management, human sexuality, environmental health, disease prevention and health promotion. The rich variety of core and program requirements is supplemented by elective courses to reflect the student’s interests in the field of health education. Extensive fieldwork, including a required practicum and internship, prepare the students for future employment.

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Media Contact: Stephanie Swan, UMF lecturer in community health education, at stephanie.swan@maine.edu or 207-778-7571

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2015/12/RP156-032.jpg

Photo Credit: UMF photo

 

UMF sustainability-minded student “recovers” prepared food for local homeless shelter

FARMINGTON, ME (December 8, 2015)—Catherine Dufault, University of Maine at Farmington junior from Holden, Mass., is working to help reduce food waste and, at the same time, help feed the hungry in Maine. A sustainability-minded student majoring in environmental planning and policy, Dufault is working to save excess food prepared in campus dining halls to help meet critical food needs at a local homeless shelter.

Her passion for helping the hungry was formalized while participating in UMF’s Good Food Co-Lab, a collaborative that supports projects to bring good food to the campus and the region. As a result, Dufault established a UMF chapter of the Food Recovery Network, a national charity that unites students on college campuses to fight food waste and hunger.

UMF student Catherine DufaultWorking as an intern for Aramark, the UMF campus dining service, she saw good, fresh, prepared food go to be recycled into compost. With the new UMF chapter of the Food Recovery Network in place, she reached out to the Western Maine Homeless Outreach in Farmington to see if she could help.

Beginning this November, Dufault and Louise Villemont, a junior from Farmington, N.H., also interning at Aramark, are “recovering” excess, prepared food from the dining service to help meet the shelter’s needs. Kept in a temperature-controlled environment, the food is then packed into a travel bin by campus food service in preparation for transport.

Dufault and Villemont, along with other members of the UMF Sustainable Campus Coalition, take the food directly to the shelter weekly to help fill the need for healthy, nourishing meals. Once there, the food is put directly into the facility’s freezer to provide ready-made meals to the shelter’s residents.

“It’s so fulfilling to see this excess food go to help our neighbors in the community,” said Dufault. “This has been something I have dreamed of for a long time. I am just thankful to finally be in a position to help.”

In addition to her work with the Food Recovery Network, Dufault helped host a campus screening of “A Place at the Table,” an examination of the issue of hunger in America. She is also working to establish a UMF food closet for needy students.

More on University of Maine at Farmington

A nationally-recognized public liberal arts college, UMF enjoys a 150-year tradition of providing a quality academic experience combined with the personal attention and close student / faculty collaboration that help prepare all students to be successful. Rooted in a tradition of teacher preparation, UMF offers top quality programs in the arts and sciences, teacher preparation, and business and pre-professional studies. UMF is located in the heart of Maine’s four-season outdoor recreational region and is a welcoming, close-knit academic community that prepares students for engaged citizenship, enriching professional careers and an enduring love of learning.

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Media Contact: Wendy Harper, UMF associate professor of economics, at wharper@maine.edu, or 207-778-7438

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2015/12/RP156-031.jpg
Photo Credit: UMF photo

Bangor-based street artist, Pigeon, presents artist talk at UMF, Dec. 8

FARMINGTON, ME (December 2, 2015)—The UMF Art Gallery and the Arts Institute of Western Maine are pleased to present an artist talk and conversation with Bangor-based street artist and activist Pigeon. This unique artist’s talk takes place at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 8, in Nordica Auditorium in University of Maine at Farmington Merrill Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

Also known as Orson Horchler, Pigeon recently installed his thought provoking “Mainers” mural on the north wall of Farmington downtown business “Java Joe’s” as part of the first “Water Bear Confabulum” community arts project.

Bangor artist

Pigeon with “Mainers” installation

In his work, Pigeon addresses ideas of place and belonging as the population of Maine becomes more fluid and diverse. In bringing his Mainers series inland to Farmington, Pigeon created a dynamic conversation about the history and definition of a Mainer today, as well as how to make people new to Maine feel at home.

This fall’s highly successful Water Bear Confabulum invited the re-imagining of everyday places in the town and its environs in surprising ways through art and performance. By subverting traditional functions and expectations of known places through the arts and by artistically invading overlooked and unconventional spaces artmakers bring fresh attention to the fabric of the town and to the local conversation with social and community ideas.

In addition to his Mainers installation, Pigeon also ran a wheat-paste workshop at this year’s Confabulum for children to hang their own drawings and paintings in downtown Farmington.

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Media Contact: Sarah Maline, director of UMF Art Gallery, at maline@maine.edu or 207-778-7321

EDITOR’S NOTE: Photo can be found at http://www2.umf.maine.edu/inside/wp-content/uploads/sites/159/2015/12/RP156-030.jpg
Photo: Pigeon with “Mainers” installation
Photo Credit: Submitted photo