Securing your Mac OS X Lion laptop

With the numerous data breaches we have read about these last few years, the University of Maine System has enacted a new information security policy. Included is a requirement that all laptops that access University resources be encrypted such that if a theft occurs, confidential information that may have been stored on the local disk is inaccessible. We will begin issuing all new machines with this level of protection this coming summer but we are also encouraging users of the most recent Mac operating system, Lion, to enable the built-in feature.

I am including directions but want to point out the security key you will be shown on the screen is EXTREMELY important. If it is lost and your computer fails, your data will not be recoverable. If you are enabling this on a UMF owned computer, please send us this key and we will securely store it for you.

To get started, open your System Preferences app and choose “Security & Privacy”. From there you will select the FileVault tab on the top and should see a screen like this:

Screen Shot 2012-02-17 at 2.19.00 PM

You will need to click the little padlock at the bottom and enter your password. From there choose “Turn On FileVault”. You will then be presented with the very important code. It will look something like this:

Screen Shot 2012-02-17 at 2.51.28 PM

Write this code down and if this is a UMF computer, copy it to an email to itshelp@umf.maine.edu so we can hold on to it. If this is not a UMF computer, it may be wise to agree to send the code to Apple and generate some questions only you can answer.

Now just let the computer reboot. It will take quite some time to actually accomplish the process afterwards but you will be able to work while it chugs away.  You can always go back to the “Security & Privacy” page to see how far along it is or just to ensure that encryption is on. I’ve already done this and it was straightforward and hasn’t caused slowdowns or other problems.

Fred

Windows Keyboard Shortcuts

If you’re like me, you like to use Windows keyboard shortcuts. Here are a few that I use. These work for Windows XP And Windows 7:

ALT ENTER When you have a file selected and hit ALT Enter it  will give you the properties of that file.

ALT Tab Will allows you to switch between open programs in Windows.

ALT F4 Typing this combination will quit the current window.

CTRL Esc Brings up the Windows start menu.

CTRL C In most Windows Programs will copy the selected file.

CTRL V Will paste the file into the current location.

CTRL X This will Cut the selected file and allow you to paste it to a different location.

CTRL Z This will undo the last thing you did.

F2 Single click on a file. Hit F2 and it will allow you to rename the file.

F3 If you hit F3 while in it will bring up a window  that allows you to search.

Shift Delete Will bring up a dialog to delete the currently selected item permanently and bypass the recycle  bin.

 

Brian Wight
Technology Support Specialist/Desktop Services

 






If you’re like me you like to use Windows keyboard shortcuts. Here are a few that I use. These work for Windows XP And Windows 7.

 

Keyboard Shortcut What does it do.

 

CTRL Esc Brings up the Windows start menu.

 

Shift Delete Will bring up a dialog to delete the currently selected item permanently and bypass the recycle bin.

F2 Single click on a file. Hit F2 and it will allow you to rename the file.

 

F3 If you hit F3 while in it will bring up a window that allows you

to search.

ALT ENTER When you have a file selected and hit ALT Enter it will give you

the properties of that file.

 

ALT Tab Will allows you to switch between open programs in Windows.

 

ALT F4 Typing this combination will

quit the current window.

 

 

CTRL C In most Windows Programs will copy the selected file.

 

CTRL V Will paste the file into the current location.

 

CTRL X This will Cut the selected file and allow you to

paste it to a different location.

 

 

CTRL Z This will undo the last thing you did.

Social Networking Tips

Social networking sites such as Facebook, Myspace and Twitter are becoming increasingly popular.  Here are a few tips you should consider:

Check out the site that you plan to use and make sure you understand the privacy policy. In most cases you will be providing personal information to this website, so use the same caution that you would to select a site where you enter your credit card information.

When you join a social network, you might be asked to enter your email address (or social networking site log on information) and passwords to find out if your contacts are on that network.  This information might be used to send email messages to everyone in your contact list asking them to join. If you have provided this information at any time you may want to change your password.

What happens on the internet stays on the internet. Even if you can delete your account or remove images or content, anyone on the Internet can still find and print photos or text or save images and videos to their computer.

Be careful when you click links that you receive in messages from your friends on your social networking sites. Treat links in messages or posts on these sites as you would links in your email.


Donna Wentworth
Technology Support Specialist/Customer Services

gmail/myCampus login changes

I’d like to alert you that effective Monday morning you will see changes in the University of Maine System login at gmail.maine.edu. For the time being you will only experience this change while on campus. Over the coming weeks it will be rolled out to the rest of the world but for now we are starting with UMF only.

What you will see at gmail.maine.edu is a login window that looks like the attached picture. Once logged in, you will find that when going to myCampus you are already logged in. And, if you start in myCampus, the gmail link no longer requires you to login again. I have had this for a few days now and find it to be most convenient.

At the same time that we create ways to make logins easier, we also need to ask that you all be more mindful of security. These single-sign-on logins vary and when logging out of one system, you may discover you are not automatically logged out of another. Your best bet if you have logged into any system that contains private information is to close your browser when you are done.

Please let us know if you have any questions or troubles.

Fred

Google Search Tips

In the past, some of you may have experienced a delay as you entered text in Google’s search engine. This was a problem that existed with something Google called, “Predicted Searching”. Where text is searched as you type it in, rather than waiting for you to finish.

Well, there is a new search technology that Google has presented that some have felt yields poor search results, known as “Personal results”. Personal results attempts to take advantage of social sites, web history, and items searched by your friends in an attempt to predict things you might be interested in. Great for finding things like restaurants, but not so great for research. Google also took the liberty of resetting the “Predicted Search”, so you may want to turn it off again. Turning these items off is simple. Just follow these instructions.

  • Go to www.google.com
  • Click on the settings icon    icon pic for google search in the top right hand corner of your browser window
  • Choose the Radio Button for ‘never show instant results’

google Search Tip pic

  • Click on the  Save button at the bottom of the page      save pic


Benjamin Wells
Technology Support Specialist/Desktop Services