1. You write a paper on the legalization of marijuana for your first-year seminar. You save that paper, make a couple of changes, and hand it in for your political science course. Could it be considered academically dishonest?

Yes                    No

 

 

2. Your professor discusses some interesting ideas in today’s lecture on Plato. You decide to use your lecture notes in your paper. Could it be considered academically dishonest?

Yes                    No

 

3. In a paper on the history of hate speech in America, you find this passage in a fall 2001 article in Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy by Jennifer E. Rothman:

“The law surrounding threats has gained recent attention from commentators after decades of virtual anonymity and unaddressed confusion among the lower courts. The sudden interest in threats has been sparked primarily by the proliferation of widely disseminated Internet speech” (Rothman 286).

You decide to use this quote as-is. Could it be considered academically dishonest?

Yes                    No

 

4. You decide to paraphrase the passage instead:

The law surrounding threats has gained notoriety lately after many years of virtual anonymity and unsolved confusion among the lower courts. The sudden interest in threats has been raised mostly by the increase in Internet use to spread messages (Rothman 286).

Could it be considered academically dishonest?

Yes                    No